African Americans in WWII

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English: Pilots of the 332nd Fighter Group, &q...

English: Pilots of the 332nd Fighter Group, “Tuskegee Airmen,” the elite, all-African American 332nd Fighter Group at Ramitelli, Italy., from left to right, Lt. Dempsey W. Morgran, Lt. Carroll S. Woods, Lt. Robert H. Nelron, Jr., Capt. Andrew D. Turner, and Lt. Clarence P. Lester. (U.S. Air Force photo) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

 

During World War II African Americans were separated from serving in the military with Whites. The African American men in the Armed Forces were placed in segregated units, lived in segregated housing, ate at segregated tables in the mess hall, and received segregated training from the white men. (1)  They were “Separate but equal” which was a strong policy at home in the US. The Army founded several African American fighters and bomber groups. One of the more famous groups called the “Tuskegee Airmen”. Although African Americans supported their government during WWII, they did not remain silent about the racial practices in America. A higher percentage of African Americans were killed compared to the percentage of whites.  Most African Americans served in Non-Combat positions such as supplies or maintenance of Military equipment.

 

http://www.nps.gov/tuai/index.htm

 

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A total of 708 African Americans were killed in combat during World War II. Their was 125,000 African Americans who were overseas in World War II. Some African American soldiers who had left farm jobs in the South decided not to return home. Instead they moved to cities looking for work that was similar to what they had learned in the Army. Within two decades after WWII the civil rights movement made progress and the African Americans finally achieved their full rights.

 

from NARA :"Andrew D. Turner, who in a fe...

from NARA :”Andrew D. Turner, who in a few minutes will be escorting heavy bombers en route to enemy targets, signals to the chief of his ground crew before taking off from a base in Italy. He is a member of the 15th U.S. Army Air Force, which has been smashing enemy objectives in Germany and the Balkans with both fighter and bomber craft. The pilot’s plane, a Mustang, is named for a type of wild horse that once roamed in America.” ca. September 1944. 208-MO-18K-32981. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3 Comments

3 Responses to “African Americans in WWII”

  1. susieQ on May 22nd, 2014 8:31 am

    I think that it wasn’t fair for African Americans that even in the military they were segregated.

    oceanmtnsky Reply:

    It is interesting that the military and professional sports is where African Americans first were able to be integrated. It took longer for us to integrate schools and the workplace.

  2. Panda__26 on June 21st, 2016 10:53 am

    It wasn’t fair that they were separated to other because of their skin color. They should be all helping each other in the war it doesn’t matter what color your skin is.

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