A Russian American Story

A Russian American Story

Jasmine

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August 6th 1997  a 15 year old girl is in the hospital giving birth to a  5lbs and 28oz baby girl. I had always lived with my Russian grandparents in a small town called B.Tavra; town of Kransnoufimsky district just outside of  Yekaterinburg Russia. My grandparents  were the ones who always took care of my sister  and I  whenever my mom wasn’t home which was pretty much very day. I lived in a blue house that was fenced in so my sister and I could play outside, had 3 or 4 bedrooms and a nice kitchen where my grandmother always cooked us food which was so good. My favorite food that was made a lot was the Bliny to drink Sbiten, and dessert the Ptichie Moloko . Bliny is like a pancake but  it is really thin and you usually put some kind of toppings either fruit or chocolate anything that would taste good on top of it and then you just roll it and eat it like a burrito. The Sbiten is a Russian hot drink which we mostly drink during the long and cold winter days. Its comforting drink is actually very simple to prepare and tastes a lot like fruity tea. The last thing that I really like is the Russian dessert Ptichie Moloko it is so good and taste like heaven. Ptasie Mleczko is a soft chocolate-covered candy filled with soft meringue.  Whenever my mom comes home she always takes me to visit my dad because he the legal right to see me. My dad was a bad alcoholic drunk bastered who thought that he can take his anger out on my mother and I . November 27th 1999 back in the hospital at the age of 17 giving birth to another baby girl at 6lbs & 5oz . My grand parents now had to take care of to baby girls because their mother was out selling herself who got pregnant 3 times by all different men. After my grandmother died, my grandfather was too devastated to take care of my sister and I so one of the neighbors called the child services and we got taken away to an orphanage. I was 5 years old when my sister and I got taken to the orphanage. We stayed at one orphanage for 2 and half years, then ended up at the hospital because we had the chicken pox, after the hospital we got sent to a different orphanage and we stayed there for 1 year and the other six months stayed with my adopted parents.

http://www.themoscowtimes.com/beyond_moscow/yekaterinburg.html

The modern history between Russia and America has been largely negative but there can be a little positive as well.  For 200 years, Russia and the United States have shared a multi-faceted diplomatic relationship.  After Russia sold Alaska in the mid 19th century to the United States they had an active alliance when Russia supported the United States Union during the American Civil War. Despite the  differences, the Soviets and the Americans united against the common enemy of Nazi Germany during World War II.

At the end of the 45 year Cold War following World War II there were peace treaties and pacts of trust but there are increasing concerns that Russia is violating the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces Treaty of 1987. On March 2007 the United States announced that they are putting an anti- ballistic missile system in Poland. In June 2007 Putin warned that if the U.S. built the missile defense system, Russia would consider targeting missiles at Poland and the Czech Republic. On 14 December 2012, President Barack Obama signed the called the Magnitsky Act, which “[imposed] U.S. travel and financial restrictions on human rights abusers in Russia”. On 28 December 2012, Russian President Vladimir Putin signed a bill, widely seen as retaliatory, that banned any United States citizen from adopting children from Russia. 

Today Russia and the United States are trying to stay peaceful and not try to make another world war 3 as they look for common ground on the fight against ISIS in Syria.   It continues to be a struggle and many people say that 2015- 25 years after the end of the Cold War that the American/ Russian relationship has echoes of the Cold War years between 1945 and 1990.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Russia%E2%80%93United_States_relations

http://www.state.gov/p/eur/ci/rs/200years/