My Grandmother’s Civil Rights Movement

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My Grandmother’s Civil Rights Movement

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What are civil rights? The “Civil rights Movement” was a struggle for African American in the years of 1950’s and 1960’s. African Americans were trying to gain their equality under the law of the United States.  The Civil Rights act of 1964 prohibits laws that discriminate on the basis of race, sex, religious belief, or national origins.  Civil Rights and civil liberties were originally introduced in the Bill of Rights and the Amendments like the 14th Amendment.  Civil liberties are defined as protections against the government and civil rights are positive acts of government that help guarantee the constitutional promises for all citizens.

Where did my grandmother grow up?

My Grandmother grew up in Pittsburgh and moved to New York City for her teenage years.

How is my family story a part of the American story of Civil Rights in the 20th century?

  • My family is apart of the civil rights movement by living in Pittsburgh during the 50’s and 60’s. There was a lot of segregation African Americans couldn’t go many places as Whites. During this movement African Americans couldn’t even vote but tried to get their voice heard for new laws and equality. My family lived through a time where there wasn’t good percentage of employment.

A Women being held because of violating laws.

Did Pittsburgh and New York City have segregation or discrimination against blacks during the 1950s and 1960s?

  • Yes Pittsburgh had segregation and discrimination in those years. Pittsburgh had everyone separated and was against blacks. NYC was going through the same thing as Pittsburgh during the civil right movement.

What were Jim Crow laws?  And When were they created?

  • Jim Crow laws was anti-black laws. It was an segregation in the south between the end of reconstruction in 1877 and the beginning of Civil rights movement 1950s.  
  • Martin Luther JR. was telling a speech at this time.

       African Americans had took role into legislative changed for equal rights with Whites. In 1968 the 14th amendment to give African American equal rights under law. 15th amendment allowed African Americans to vote.

How or Why did the United States make more progress in Civil Rights after World War II? What are some of the main advancements in the 1950s and 1960s?

  1. They went into Reconstruction was a type of period where new challenges are introduced. Blacks gained a voice and tried their hardest to get freedom. During this time Whites tried to suppress the new freedom.

Who was Martin Luther King Sr?

  • He was Martin Luther JR father. He was an Baptist pastor, missionary, also an early figure in the Civil Rights movement. King was a member of the Baptist Church and decided to become a preacher after being inspired by ministers who were prepared to stand up for racial equality. King Sr. was a major figure in the civil rights movement in Georgia, where he rose to become the head of the NAACP in Atlanta and the Civic and Political League. He led the fight for equal teachers’ salaries in Atlanta. He also played an instrumental role in ending Jim Crow laws in the state. King Sr. had refused to ride on Atlanta’s bus system since the 1920s after a vicious attack on black passengers with no action against those responsible. King Sr. stressed the need for an educated, politically active black ministry.

 

Rosa Parks- Sat down on a bus December 1, 1955, She had refused to give up her seat to an white man and got arrested on scene. During this time African Americans couldn’t sit in the front or if anyone white wanted to sit in there seat it was a must to give it up. She Boycott Montgomery, Alabama for 381 days.

 

Links; http://www.history.com/topics/black-history/civil-rights-movement ,

http://www.post-gazette.com/life/lifestyle/2008/04/02/MLK-riots-When-patience-ran-out-the-Hill-went-up-in-flames/stories/200804020235 ,

http://www.marintheatre.org/productions/fences/fences-pittsburgh-1957 ,

http://www.history.com/topics/american-civil-war/reconstruction

Image result for civil rights movement pittsburgh

Wanting equality and a voice.

Image result for civil rights movement pittsburgh

A African American women protesting for citizen rights and also youth rights.

Image result for civil rights movement pittsburgh

1 Comment

One Response to “My Grandmother’s Civil Rights Movement”

  1. simon.21 on April 25th, 2019 9:00 am

    The civil rights movement was one that won’t be forgotten. This movement was able to give a view on how different blacks were viewed by whites. The views on a race like blacks were unfair and very racist. I am half African American and my family has told me multiple stories as well as me witnessing tough situations. The color of your skin should not determine your wealth, social class and life. You live your own life and make your own decisions. You make mistakes, it was your choice you just need to learn, and blacks have learned and no longer allow for whites to run them into the ground.

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